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Advertising Law Blog

The Advertising Law Blog provides commentary and news on developing legal issues in advertising, promotional marketing, Internet, and privacy law. This blog is sponsored by the Advertising, Marketing & Promotions group at Olshan. The practice is geared to servicing the needs of the advertising, promotional marketing, and digital industries with a commitment to providing personal, efficient and effective legal service.

Showing 138 posts in FTC.

Olshan Advertising and Branding Law Groups' Hot Topics - 2023

Happy New Year! As we begin 2023, Olshan’s Advertising and Branding law groups share their list of hot topics that look to be on the horizon this year and should be of particular interest to you.   Read More ›

Andrew Lustigman Quoted by Law360 on the FTC’s Consumer Protection Rulemaking and Enforcement in 2023

Andrew Lustigman, Chair of Olshan's Advertising, Marketing & Promotion's Group and Co-Chair of the firm’s Brand Management & Protection Group, was quoted in Law360 (subscription required) on the Federal Trade Commission’s (“FTC”) consumer protection rulemaking and enforcement efforts in 2023. The agency’s focus on pricing disclosures—specifically its October 2022 proposed rulemaking on addressing “junk fees,” unnecessary, unavoidable, or surprise charges that inflate costs while adding little to no value to consumers—will potentially affect “a wide array of industries,” Andy commented. “Similar rulemaking has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Transportation relating to airline pricing and ancillaries like baggage fees,” he added. Additionally, the FTC is expected to continue focusing on advertisers’ use of endorsements and testimonials that consumers increasingly rely on in digital commerce. Read More ›

Class Action Accuses Amazon Prime of “Dark Patterns”

* Taylor Lodise is a law clerk in the Litigation practice group.

On November 9, 2022, amidst ongoing investigations by the FTC regarding “dark patterns” that Amazon allegedly employed to discourage subscribers from canceling their Amazon Prime memberships, a class-action lawsuit named Amazon as a defendant. The lawsuit was filed in United States District Court for the Western District of Washington and is styled Dorobiala v. Amazon.com, Inc. Read More ›

FTC Seeks Comments on “Junk Fees” – Signaling a Renewed Focus on Supplemental Fees

On October 20, 2022, the Federal Trade Commission issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking for a rule that would seek to address so called “junk fees” – unnecessary, unavoidable, or surprise charges that inflate costs while adding little to no value to consumers. Read More ›

FTC Reaches $100 Million Settlement With Vonage Over Subscription Practices

Internet phone service provider, Vonage, has agreed to pay $100 million to settle the Federal Trade Commission’s charges that it imposed fees and made it difficult for subscribers to cancel their service. Specifically, the FTC alleged that Vonage implemented “dark patterns” to create obstacles for subscribers looking to cancel their services, often resulting in consumers being charged even after they had requested cancellation. This settlement highlights the FTC’s continued focus on “dark pattern” marketing techniques, particularly as they are applied to cancellation of automatically renewing subscription arrangements. Read More ›

Kim Kardashian to pay $1.26 Million towards “Unlawful Touting” SEC Charges

* Rachel Gold is a law clerk in the Corporate/Securities Law practice group.

Following up on its action against other celebrities who have promoted crypto investments without disclosing their compensation interest, the Securities and Exchange Commissions (“SEC”) announced “unlawful touting” charges and Order against reality star Kim Kardashian for promoting a cryptocurrency on social media without acknowledging that she was being compensated for the post. This enforcement action is a reminder that it is not just the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) who is enforcing compensation disclosures on social media. Read More ›

FTC and Six States Sue Roomster for Fake Listings and Reviews

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), along with six states, filed a lawsuit against housing rental listing platform, Roomster Corp. (“Roomster”), its co-founders, John Shriber and Roman Zaks, and the principal of a related app that provided allegedly fake reviews, Jonathan Martinez. The lawsuit, filed in the Southern District of New York, alleges that the defendants used fake reviews to entice consumers to join and pay for access to its platform. The lawsuit is a reminder that federal and state regulators are increasingly focused on the legitimacy of consumer reviews, particularly given their impact on purchasing decisions.   Read More ›

FTC Proposes Revisions to its Endorsement Guides and .com Guidance

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) is set to issue updates to both its Endorsement Guides and .com Disclosure Guidance. The proposed updates to both guidance documents signifies the FTC’s ongoing attention to online and social media advertising, as the regulator takes steps to bring its guidance into focus with contemporary advertising issues. Read More ›

Telemarketing Sales Rule May Be Expanded to Cover B2B Conduct

FTC likely to eliminate the exemption

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) is considering a proposed amendment to the Telemarketing Sales Rule (“TSR”) that would broaden the rule’s scope by prohibiting material misrepresentations and false or misleading statements in business-to-business (“B2B”) transactions. Read More ›

FTC Once Again Focuses on Earnings Claims

FTC's recent actions regarding earnings claims makes clear that the agency is focused on challenging earnings claims, particularly those that are atypical. Read More ›

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